International Symposium on Grids & Clouds (ISGC) 2018
in conjunction with
Frontiers in Computational Drug Discovery (FCDD)

16-23 March 2018, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

Keynote Speakers

In Last Name Alphabetical Order:

 

Volker Guelzow

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DESY, DE

Presentation Title:

Scientific Computing for large Infrastructure in Europe - a personal view

Abstract:

Technology development for existing and new scientific infrastructures lead to drastic increases of computing, storage and network demands. This goes along with the request for professional software development in science and with a new class of people with new skills, often called the "data scientist". New challenges for scientific computing are coming at every step of the workflow for scientific data, starting with the data ingest, the analysis and the management of the data according to the FAIR principles and to finally archive the data and in case the software. In this talk these topics will be covered and the European and national view from a personal perspective will be described.

Bio:

Prof. Volker Guelzow is a Professor of computer science and the head of the DESY computing department, supporting a large variety of scientific communities, like High Energy Physics, Photons Science, Biology and many more. He studied mathematics and physics at the University of Göttingen, from where he received his PhD in 1988. He worked for the German Aerospace Establishment and the German Climate Computer Center, mainly on large simulations and on HPC systems. Prior to joining DESY in 2001, he was the Director of the Computer Center of the University of Kiel. His main interests are HPC systems, Big Data management and analysis methods with a focus on artificial intelligence. He is involved in a large variety of national and international projects and particularly interested in the objectives of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and the FAIR data principles. Beside this he is a professor for computer science at the University of Applied Sciences in Berlin.

 

Chuan Yao Lin

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Academia Sinica, TW

Presentation Title:

Long-range transport of Southeast Asia biomass burning pollutants to Taiwan: Impacts and implications

Abstract:

It happens to be the biomass burning season in spring time from Indochina. Under favor weather conditions, the products of biomass burning pollutants could be transported easily to Taiwan and even East Asia. Actually, the complex interactions of these air pollutants and aerosols features in the boundary layer and aloft have resulted in complex characteristics of air pollutants and aerosols distributions in the lower troposphere. For example, at the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (LABS) (elevation 2862 m) in central Taiwan, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3) and particulate matter with diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were found to be 135-200 ppb, 40-56 ppb, and 13-26 μg/m3, respectively in the springtime (February-April) between 2006 and 2009, which are 2-3 times higher than those in other seasons.

The project “Effect of Megacities on the transport and transformation of pollutants on the Regional and Global scales (EMeRGe)” aims to improve our knowledge and prediction of the transport and transformation patterns of European and Asian megacities pollutant outflows. In EMeRGe Asia, the composition of the plumes of pollution entering and leaving Asia measured by the new High Altitude and LOng Range (HALO) aircraft research platform. The HALO aircraft performing optimized transects and vertical profiling in Asia during 12 March and 7 April in 2018. To design the measurement of aircraft flight paths and elevations, a high resolution, 9 km, numerical prediction by Weather Research Forecast (WRF) and WRF-Chem models were joined and performed during the campaigns. The LRT of biomass burning organic aerosol to Taiwan measured by HALO could be more than 2 ug/m3 at the elevation of 2500 m on 20 March, 2018. Model performances and the results will be discussed in this meeting. Overall, this series of studies significantly fill the gap of our understanding on air pollutants transformation and transport to Taiwan and East Asia, and show the potential directions of future studies.

Bio:

Dr. Chuan-Yao Lin is currently serving as Research Fellow in Research Center for Environmental Changes (RCEC), Academia Sinica, Taiwan.  He is an associate editor of journal Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (TAO) and a board member of Environmental Protection, Taiwan. He was also a board member of Taiwan Group on Earth Observation (TGEO) in 2010-2016. In 2015-2017, he served as Secretary General, Meteorological Society of the Republic of China. He received the Ph.D. degree in Atmospheric Science from National Central University, Taiwan in 1996. His research interests include regional climate change, urban heat island effect, mesoscale meteorology and air quality.

 

 

Mao-Ning Tuanmu

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Academia Sinica, TW

Presentation Title:

Listening to Biodiversity and its Changes – Introduction of Asian Soundscape Monitoring Network

Abstract:

Loss of biodiversity and associated ecosystem services is one of the major challenges facing humanity. Monitoring biodiversity status and trends across spatial and temporal scales is necessary to mitigate impacts of human-induced environmental changes and secure human well-being. Soundscape, the collection of all sounds emanating from a landscape, reflects the dynamics of biological, environmental and societal systems in a landscape as well as the interactions among them. Investigating the spatiotemporal patterns of soundscape can provide insights into characteristics of those systems and their responses to environmental changes. Soundscape monitoring is thus a useful tool for tracking biodiversity under global changes. Asian Soundscape Monitoring Network was established in 2014 with the aims to understand soundscape patterns, enhance the capacity of soundscape monitoring, open up soundscape data and promote soundscape research in the Asian region. Since then, long-term monitoring sites have been established in Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to collect data on terrestrial, marine and ultrasonic soundscapes. In this talk, I will introduce this network, show the achievements so far, describe short- and long-term plans, and provide some example applications of soundscape data collected in the network.

Bio:

Dr. Mao-Ning Tuanmu is a biogeographer who is interested in the spatiotemporal patterns of biodiversity, their underlying driving processes and implications for biodiversity conservation. He integrates remote sensing, acoustic sensing, ecological modeling, big data analyses and machine learning to characterize biodiversity patterns across spatial and temporal scales. His research has been published in many top-tier journals, including Nature Climate Change, Nature Communications and Global Ecology and Biogeography. He is an Assistant Research Fellow at Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica. He is also an Executive Director of the Center for Systematics and Biodiversity Informatics, which holds Taiwan’s node of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility, an international organization focusing on making biodiversity data available via the Internet. The Center aims to integrate biodiversity information in Taiwan, provide infrastructure for biodiversity data management, mobilization and reuse, and promote data opening and sharing.

 

Bryan Pijanowski

Purdue University, US

Presentation I: (1 April 2019)

Changing the Lens on Soundscape Ecological Research: What We Can Do to Address Current Grand Environmental Challenges

Sound is a universal measure of change and is one of the most emotional senses humans possess.  How can we take advantage of these two fundamental notions to help improve ecological and social well-being of this planet?  I address this question with a summary of my vision for how the paradigm of soundscape ecology is uniquely positioned to advance the critical understanding of our changing world.  New pathways of scholarship are clearly needed but they are within our reach even today. I conclude with seven rules we must follow to fulfill this vision so that we may achieve a more sustainable planet.

Presentation II: (3 April 2019)

Transitioning to the Fourth Paradigm of Discovery

We have now entered the era of big data.  Few know what this truly entails but those of us that are confronted with it know that it means we need to do our work differently.  Indeed, scholars across disciplines as diverse as ecology, social science, medicine, and physics understand that addressing big data challenges requires entirely new approaches.  One visionary that contemplated the impact that big data has on society – Jim Gray of Microsoft – suggested that our approach to science and engineering must require new thinking that is transformative – that we need to enter into a new, fourth paradigm of discovery.  Is it possible for us to transition to this this new paradigm?  What is necessary for us to achieve this?  I outline an approach that I believe that is needed to confront, head on, the enormous challenges of big data.  I argue that we cannot retreat either, as the potential that this era has to address grand challenges problems in society are boundless.

Bio:

Dr. Bryan Pijanowski is a landscape ecologist who focuses on analyzing the dynamics of soundscapes in natural and human dominated places. A soundscape is the collection of all sounds of a place, including those from the biological community (biophony), geophysical environment (geophony), and sounds made by humans (anthrophony). He is the first author of several well-cited papers that outline the new field of soundscape ecology.  He has completed several dozen projects that leverage this new science to address a host of problems related to biodiversity decline, nature deficient disorder and climate change. He is the director of the Purdue Discovery Park Center for Global Soundscapes and a University Faculty Scholar. Bryan is also the Executive Producer of an IMAX-experience Interactive Film Global Soundscapes: A Mission to Record the Earth. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, USGS, National Park Service, NOAA, NASA, Great Lakes Fishery Trust, Kellogg Foundation, USDA and the Department of Education. Collaborations include those in engineering (big data, analytics), social science, and the humanities. He has also produced a summer camp program for kids, hosts a global citizen science program called RecordTheEarth.org, and an online, integrated STEM learning platform for middle school youth called iListen.org. His massive library (> 1PB) can be found online (Chorus4Nature.org). His work has been featured on CNN, Nova, NPR Science Friday, NPR Weekend Edition, NBC Today Show, New York Times Magazine, BBC World News Service and Australian NPR, to name a few.

 

 

William Seales

University of Kentucky, US

Presentation Title:

Digital Humanities in the Cloud:  Reading the Invisible Library

Abstract:

Progress over the past decade in the digitization and analysis of text found in cultural objects (inscriptions, manuscripts, scrolls) has led to new methods for reading the “invisible library”.  This talk explains the development of non-invasive methods, showing results from restoration projects on Homeric manuscripts, Herculaneum material, and Dead Sea scrolls.  Premised on “virtual unwrapping” as an engine for discovery, the presentation culminates in a new approach - Reference-Amplified Computed Tomography (RACT) – where machine learning and cloud computing becomes a crucial part of the imaging pipeline. You will leave this talk considering that RACT may indeed be the pathway for rescuing still-readable text from some of the most stubbornly damaged materials, like the enigmatic Herculaneum scrolls.

Bio:

W. Brent Seales is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Computer Science and Director of the Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments at the University of Kentucky. Seales’ research applies computer vision and visualization to challenges in the restoration of antiquities, surgical technology, and big data visualization. In the 2012-13 he was a Google Visiting Scientist in Paris, where he continued work on the “virtual unwrapping” of the Herculaneum scrolls. In 2015, Seales and his research team identified the oldest known Hebrew copy of the book of Leviticus (other than the Dead Sea Scrolls), carbon dated to the third century C.E. The reading of the text from within the damaged scroll has been hailed as one of the most significant discoveries in biblical archaeology of the past decade.

 

Von Welch

Indiana University Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, US

Presentation Title:

FAIR in an unfair world: cybersecurity, data breaches, data integrity, and open science

Abstract:

Data breaches have evolved from routinely making headlines, to making headlines only when they involved large fractions of the world’s population, to being routine to the point of no longer being newsworthy. In the U.S., there is increasing emphasis on cybersecurity to assure the confidentiality of data, emphasis that is reaching into higher education and research through contractual requirements. However, as we consider shared data and large scientific datasets, we need cybersecurity that appropriately respects broadly shared data whose greatest challenges may lie with integrity and availability and that is applicable to projects of all science domains and sizes. This talk will cover work in cybersecurity for science by the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence and other NSF projects.

Bio:

Von Welch is the director of the Indiana University Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research. CACR has a unique focus - improve real world cybersecurity for organizations with missions that challenge for traditional cybersecurity approaches. Examples include research and development, open science, and highly distributed collaborations. CACR project partners and funders include the US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, Department of Homeland Security, as well as private sector organizations - and Von’s roles span research, development, operations, and leadership. Von is a frequent public speaker, and he has authored nearly 50 publications and multiple internet standards.

 

Ping Yeh


Google, US

Presentation Title:

Is the hype real? An introduction to quantum computing

Abstract:

Quantum computing has been a buzzword for a while. Contradicting information and hype are all over the internet. Many governments, industry leaders, and venture capitalists all over the world are investing heavily into it. I'll introduce the basic concepts in quantum computing and Google's efforts on superconducting quantum computer. I'll also assess what researchers can do with quantum computing now and in the near future, and talk about how to become quantum-ready in this exciting time.

Bio:

Dr. Ping Yeh is a software engineer in Google's quantum hardware lab. He measured mass of top quark in the CDF experiment in Fermilab and received his Ph.D. in 1996 from National Taiwan University. He worked on particle physics experiments Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, Belle, and CMS prior to joining Google, where he has worked on projects on search, mobile apps, advertising, and quantum computing.